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October 29, 2015

Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.Thirty-five per cent of family office CEOs are female, according to a new report, compared to just 4.6% in the S&P 500.

The diversity of families appears to be reflected in family office personnel – at least when it comes to gender – research from Family Office Exchange (FOX) and US advisory firm Grant Thornton suggests.

In a survey of 112 family offices, 35% were headed by a female chief executive, said the 2015 FOX Family Office Compensation and Benefits Report, compared to 4.6% in the S&P 500. In a release FOX said the gender statistics had been “surprising”.

July 17, 2014

A fresh-faced CEO straight out of business school isn't always the person to inspire public and investor confidence, but circumstances sometimes force a young candidate into the top spot at a family firm.

Picking a chief executive for any family business is a tough task. It is especially problematic if the company is bent on keeping a family member in the top job. This was the conundrum Gianni Agnelli faced when trying to prepare an heir to take the wheel of his family’s iconic Italian car brand Fiat. Drug addiction in his only son and then stomach cancer in his nephew saw his pool of potential successors whittled down to his 21-year-old grandson John Elkann.

May 19, 2014

Campden Wealth, in association with Societe Generale Private Banking, has announced the shortlist for the European Families in Business Awards 2014.

Campden Wealth, in association with Societe Generale Private Banking, has announced the shortlist for the European Families in Business Awards 2014.

A jury composed of business school experts and the Campden Wealth editorial team has drawn up a shortlist from more than 250 businesses and entrepreneurs nominated by their peers on the CampdenFB magazine website, as well as by readers of the magazine.

March 12, 2014

Family business leaders who think they “know best” and adopt a paternalistic leadership style can lead to unsuccessful succession transitions, according to new research, by leading to feelings of dissatisfaction and inertia in the next generation.

Family business leaders who think they “know best” and adopt a paternalistic leadership style can lead to unsuccessful succession transitions, according to new research, by leading to feelings of dissatisfaction and inertia in the next generation.

December 25, 2013

Its not easy to join the board of the family business as a woman, especially if you have never worked in the guts of the business, but don't let timidity undermine your role as a decision maker – Dr Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj has some tips.

Women are increasingly being recruited onto family business boards. This is a good thing. An ever-increasing body of evidence shows that diversity is good for a business. But joining the board of a family business can be a mixed blessing. On the one hand you are at the epicentre of decision-making. On the other, as a woman you may find that you are struggling to assert yourself.

December 18, 2011

Family businesses are the backbone of Italy’s economy but governance seems to be their biggest challenge, with many family firms struggling when it comes to integrating non-family executives.

Family businesses are the backbone of Italy’s economy but governance seems to be their biggest challenge, with many family firms struggling when it comes to integrating non-family executives and expanding the business, according to a leading academic.

Guido Corbetta, professor of family business at Bocconi University, told CampdenFB that companies with concentrated ownership and leadership structures, typically with few family members involved, tend to work best.

August 25, 2010

A non-family CEO hired from within a company, who is familiar with and appreciates its culture and values, is far more likely than an outside CEO to continue the company's success.

Tom Davidow says:

A non-family CEO hired from within a company, who is familiar with and appreciates its culture and values, is far more likely than an outside CEO to continue the company's success. As Jim Collins points out in Built to Last, companies that last for generations maintain the original founder's culture and values. It doesn't matter if it changes its product.

May 5, 2010

Antonio Conejero doesn’t pull any punches. “When the next generation is lazy, the company will probably die,” he says.

Antonio Conejero doesn't pull any punches. "When the next generation is lazy, the company will probably die," he says.

As head of the real estate division of his family business, Spain-based Grupo Siro, and president of the FBN next gen committee, the 38-year-old has a vested interest in ensuring his peers hear his message loud and clear.

May 5, 2010

During the life cycle of a family business, there may come a point when the current leader is ready to retire and there is no next generation member ready to take over, writes Jurgen Geerlings

During the life cycle of a family business, there may come a point when the current leader is ready to retire and there is no next generation member with the ability or the inclination to take over, writes Jurgen Geerlings. 

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